Hello from Orient

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Hello from Orient

Unread postby leleart » 28 December 2019, 03:54

Nickname: Art
Age: 22
Orientation: Gay
Where you live: China
Where you're from: China
What you do : Senior year undergraduate
Dream Job: Clinical psychologist
Religion : Atheist
Political philosophy: emm...don't have particular one, I guess? maybe socialism?
Interests and hobbies: Movie, tv series, reading, hiking, and jogging
Drinking, drugs or sobriety: Nah
Special talents: I guess...Talking in a very mean manner?
Pet peeves: Stereotype
Personal hero: No idea
Favourite real-life homosexual: No idea either.
Favourite movies: God's Own Country, Once
Favourite TV shows: Will and Grace, Mr. Robot, Humans
Favourite music: Varies, lol but especially folklore.
Favourite books: To Live
Favourite food: Dumplings
A quote to live by: Still struggling to find one.
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby René » 28 December 2019, 06:25

Hey Art, welcome to the forum :keke:

leleart wrote:Political philosophy: emm...don't have particular one, I guess? maybe socialism?

That's a good one, as long as you don't think the Chinese government is a good example of it :D

leleart wrote:Favourite TV shows: Will and Grace, Mr. Robot, Humans

Have you seen the latest season of Mr. Robot? My husband and I just started watching it the other night.
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby leleart » 28 December 2019, 06:57

Hi, Rene, thanks for your lovely welcome.

René wrote:
leleart wrote:Favourite TV shows: Will and Grace, Mr. Robot, Humans

Have you seen the latest season of Mr. Robot? My husband and I just started watching it the other night.


Yes, actually I just finished the last episode of season 4 this Monday, but you don't want me to spoil the ending, do you? ;) (Although I really want to see more story about Darlane and Dom, the Run Away with Me by Carly Rae Jepsen in Darlan and Dom's story line really turned me on in Episode 10).
Last edited by Brenden on 28 December 2019, 13:08, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Fixed quote.
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby René » 28 December 2019, 07:13

leleart wrote:Yes, actually I just finished the last episode of season 4 this Monday, but you don't want me to spoil the ending, do you? ;) (Although I really want to see more story about Darlane and Dom, the Run Away with Me by Carly Rae Jepsen in Darlan and Dom's story line really turned me on in Episode 10).

Yeah, no spoilers please :P

Did you enjoy it more than season 3? I was a bit bored by season 3 a lot of the time.
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby leleart » 28 December 2019, 07:19

René wrote:Did you enjoy it more than season 3? I was a bit bored by season 3 a lot of the time.


Well, actually yes. The storyline in season 4 makes much more sense generally, and to be honest, I forget about most things happened in Season 3 :facepalm: . So I would rate season 3 7/10 but season 4 8.5/10.
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby René » 28 December 2019, 07:26

Great, then I look forward to seeing the rest of it :)

Anyway, your English is really good! Was it difficult to learn coming from Chinese?
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby leleart » 28 December 2019, 07:42

René wrote:Anyway, your English is really good! Was it difficult to learn coming from Chinese?


Lol, for me, learning English is not that difficult because my dad start to teach me since I was about 4 or 5. As a matter of fact, I am in a Sino-western university in China, so lectures, assignments and even exams are in English, and I have to use English all the time, lol.

However, as a part time english tutor, I believe some kids do find it hard, since it's a completely different lingustic system from Chinese. Still, there are a lot of fluent English user (P.S. I did not use the word "speaker", you soon will know why) in China since it is a mandatory subject in the education system and Chinese university admission test, Gaokao (Similar to SAT in the U.S. and GCSE in the U.K.). Thus most people can understand, read, and write in English in some degree as tested in exams , but speaking is really a big problem for most Chinese students. We call it "哑巴英语" (Mute english).
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby Brenden » 28 December 2019, 13:16

Welcome to the forum, Art!

I love dumplings! I recently passed a dim sum restaurant in Glasgow and I was practically drooling at all the dumplings I could see through the window. :drool:

There are a lot of psychologists in René’s family, or at least people who studied psychology at university, but none of them are clinical. One is a research administrator at a university. Another is now a database administrator for a telecom company, haha.
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby leleart » 28 December 2019, 13:32

Thanks for your warm welcoming! Brenden!

Brenden wrote:I love dumplings! I recently passed a dim sum restaurant in Glasgow and I was practically drooling at all the dumplings I could see through the window. :drool:


Wow, you are in Glasgow? I will very likely to start my postgraduate studies in University of Glasgow next september (or University of Edinburgh...I have received offer letter from both, but have not make final decision yet). If I go to Glasgow, you have to tell me where to find that awsome drooling dumpling resturant then!Cuz literally in the past a few weeks as Spring Festivals approaching, dumplings are always in my breakfast dish, and I cannot live without them even when I move to the U.K. :awesome:

Brenden wrote:There are a lot of psychologists in René’s family, or at least people who studied psychology at university, but none of them are clinical. One is a research administrator at a university. Another is now a database administrator for a telecom company, haha.


It's interesting to know that! A family full of psychologist! It is so unusual in China, especially I am the only one study Psychology in a college from my family, and it takes me a lot efforts to let my parents to understand why I study this subject. I guess I will have a lot to talk about with René then, lol. :lol:
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby Brenden » 28 December 2019, 13:54

leleart wrote:
Brenden wrote:I love dumplings! I recently passed a dim sum restaurant in Glasgow and I was practically drooling at all the dumplings I could see through the window. :drool:

Wow, you are in Glasgow? I will very likely to start my postgraduate studies in University of Glasgow next september (or University of Edinburgh...I have received offer letter from both, but have not make final decision yet). If I go to Glasgow, you have to tell me where to find that awsome drooling dumpling resturant then! Cuz literally in the past a few weeks as Spring Festivals approaching, dumplings are always in my breakfast dish, and I cannot live without them even when I move to the U.K. :awesome:

We actually live in a wee town in the countryside about a 40-minute train ride from Glasgow centre, and a 45-minute train ride from Edinburgh centre, but we go into Glasgow more than Edinburgh because the train is cheaper (shorter distance, but slower with more stops) and more frequent.

The University of Glasgow is a great one I hear! And Glasgow is a nice city (especially since Police Scotland have largely gotten crime under control in recent years; all Scottish cities are now much safer than their English counterparts, especially London). It's more metropolitan and city-like than Edinburgh, with far fewer tourists. Edinburgh is super charming, but more as a place to visit, not to live. Edinburghers are a bit cooler and not as hospitable (it doesn't help matters that a huge chunk of the city's population isn't actually Scottish) as Glaswegians. Unlike Edinburgh, which only has one tram line and essentially one train line running through it, Glasgow has a circular subway (third oldest in the world) and a large network of train lines in and around it, and a short train ride north has you right in the Highlands. I'd definitely recommend Glasgow over Edinburgh.

We'll have to meet up once you're in Scotland!

leleart wrote:
Brenden wrote:There are a lot of psychologists in René’s family, or at least people who studied psychology at university, but none of them are clinical. One is a research administrator at a university. Another is now a database administrator for a telecom company, haha.

It's interesting to know that! A family full of psychologist! It is so unusual in China, especially I am the only one study Psychology in a college from my family, and it takes me a lot efforts to let my parents to understand why I study this subject. I guess I will have a lot to talk about with René then, lol. :lol:

René himself is super into neuropsychopharmacology!
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby leleart » 28 December 2019, 14:10

Brenden wrote:The University of Glasgow is a great one I hear! And Glasgow is a nice city (especially since Police Scotland have largely gotten crime under control in recent years; all Scottish cities are now much safer than their English counterparts, especially London). It's more metropolitan and city-like than Edinburgh, with far fewer tourists. Edinburgh is super charming, but more as a place to visit, not to live. Edinburghers are a bit cooler and not as hospitable (it doesn't help matters that a huge chunk of the city's population isn't actually Scottish) as Glaswegians. Unlike Edinburgh, which only has one tram line and essentially one train line running through it, Glasgow has a circular subway (third oldest in the world) and a large network of train lines in and around it, and a short train ride north has you right in the Highlands. I'd definitely recommend Glasgow over Edinburgh.

We'll have to meet up once you're in Scotland!


Great!! Cuz personally I lean towards UoG more than Edinburgh as well. And the reason why I avoide London though they have really good institutions such as KCL and UCL, is because the crime rate. So it is nice to hear about Scottish Police are doing great jobs! :applause:

For sure, once I am there, we could grab a drink! Don't ghosted me :D !

Brenden wrote:René himself is super into neuropsychopharmacology!


OMG, neuropsychopharmacology is one of the courses that I want to take most! Unluckily my university does not offer that course. I must talk with René about those super interesting topics, lol!!! :awesome: :awesome:
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby René » 28 December 2019, 14:30

What an awesome coincidence that you plan to attend the University of Glasgow! I look forward to meeting up sometime :awesome:

leleart wrote:
Brenden wrote:René himself is super into neuropsychopharmacology!

OMG, neuropsychopharmacology is one of the courses that I want to take most! Unluckily my university does not offer that course. I must talk with René about those super interesting topics, lol!!! :awesome: :awesome:

With hindsight, I should definitely have taken courses that would have taken me more in that direction, with the aim of becoming e.g. a biochemical/pharmacological researcher or a psychiatrist / clinical pharmacologist. Psychology was also always tempting, but for me, it would be unspeakably frustrating not to be entitled to prescribe medications to my patients (or at least direct the medical treatment they would receive if I referred them to a practitioner with prescribing privileges).

You may find some posts I made in a recent thread about a medical mishap I had last month of interest, by the way!
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby René » 28 December 2019, 14:46

Scotland is amazing, by the way! The people here are so nice, there's a good railway network, beautiful mountains and rolling landscapes, and the healthcare system is fantastic (one of the best in the world IMO; it's just underfunded and therefore not as effective as it could be because (mainly) English people keep voting in Tories). This is the fourth country I've experienced living in, and I can't imagine ever wanting to live anywhere else.
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby leleart » 28 December 2019, 15:07

René wrote:What an awesome coincidence that you plan to attend the University of Glasgow! I look forward to meeting up sometime :awesome:


I agree! We three should grab a drink together in Glasgow. :applause:

leleart wrote:
Brenden wrote:René himself is super into neuropsychopharmacology!

OMG, neuropsychopharmacology is one of the courses that I want to take most! Unluckily my university does not offer that course. I must talk with René about those super interesting topics, lol!!! :awesome: :awesome:

René wrote:With hindsight, I should definitely have taken courses that would have taken me more in that direction, with the aim of becoming e.g. a biochemical/pharmacological researcher or a psychiatrist / clinical pharmacologist. Psychology was also always tempting, but for me, it would be unspeakably frustrating not to be entitled to prescribe medications to my patients (or at least direct the medical treatment they would receive if I referred them to a practitioner with prescribing privileges).

You may find some posts I made in a recent thread about a medical mishap I had last month of interest, by the way!


Oh, so sorry to hear that! That must be a very hard time for you. But I am so glad that you recover from that! :hug:

I agree with your idea of being a medical practitioner, especially when comes to the situation where psychothearaphies can't have a big help, such as acute psychosis attack or acute schizophrenia. During my internship in a local psychiatric facility, I met a lot of clients (or patients in psychiatric perspective) who were either not receiving proper medication or psychotherapies, which made me think about the collaboration between psychology and psychiatry.

Actually, I thought about being a Psychiatrist before, but since I studied in humanities & social science track in my high school in China, there was no way for me get into a medical school. I also considered about going abroad like the U.S. or U.K. for medical and psychiatric training, but there was no way for me and my family to cover the scary expense. Therefore, here I am, studying psychology and pursuing the profession in clinical psychology. If I can be a PhD candidate after my Master, I would probably get the chance to do internship in NHS I guess, which would be optimal for me at that point.

But still, I am very interested in psychopharmacology, and will continue to learn about that field.
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby René » 28 December 2019, 15:35

leleart wrote:
René wrote:What an awesome coincidence that you plan to attend the University of Glasgow! I look forward to meeting up sometime :awesome:

I agree! We three should grab a drink together in Glasgow. :applause:

We should indeed have a social interaction during which liquids will be consumed (tap water in my case :D).

leleart wrote:Oh, so sorry to hear that! That must be a very hard time for you. But I am so glad that you recover from that! :hug:

It never felt like a really big thing for me personally, actually — for the most part, it felt like a little vacation, and like everyone was overreacting a little because I pretty much felt just fine. Queen Elizabeth University Hospital Glasgow was excellent. I have very fond memories of my stay. The food was really great and having 4 meals a day brought to me in bed felt very luxurious :P

It was much harder on Brenden and the rest of my family.

leleart wrote:I agree with your idea of being a medical practitioner, especially when comes to the situation where psychothearaphies can't have a big help, such as acute psychosis attack or acute schizophrenia. During my internship in a local psychiatric facility, I met a lot of clients (or patients in psychiatric perspective) who were either not receiving proper medication or psychotherapies, which made me think about the collaboration between psychology and psychiatry.

I do think the potential role of psychologists is sometimes underestimated, even in severe illnesses like schizophrenia. Especially when I read articles like this (which I found very interesting):

"When Hearing Voices Is a Good Thing"
"Hallucinatory 'voices' shaped by local culture, Stanford anthropologist says"

It seems to me that psychologists/psychotherapists could play a massive role in improving clinical outcomes by helping patients change their patterns of thought and think about their conditions/symptoms in more constructive ways.

I also recall reading some research showing that schizophrenic patients in developing countries who lack access to antipsychotics have better long-term outcomes than patients treated in the western world using antipsychotics, indicating that while antipsychotics are acutely helpful, chronic use actually worsens the condition. (Which makes sense if you consider that blocking dopamine receptors will simply lead to their expression/density being upregulated — an example of homeostasis.)
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby leleart » 29 December 2019, 08:44

René wrote:
leleart wrote:
René wrote:What an awesome coincidence that you plan to attend the University of Glasgow! I look forward to meeting up sometime :awesome:

I agree! We three should grab a drink together in Glasgow. :applause:

We should indeed have a social interaction during which liquids will be consumed (tap water in my case :D).

It sounds like a much healthier alternative!lol. :D

leleart wrote:Oh, so sorry to hear that! That must be a very hard time for you. But I am so glad that you recover from that! :hug:

It never felt like a really big thing for me personally, actually — for the most part, it felt like a little vacation, and like everyone was overreacting a little because I pretty much felt just fine. Queen Elizabeth University Hospital Glasgow was excellent. I have very fond memories of my stay. The food was really great and having 4 meals a day brought to me in bed felt very luxurious :P

It was much harder on Brenden and the rest of my family.


It is delighted to know that you have a joyful experience at the hospital, and it also astonished me that what a wonderful mindset you have! From a health psychology standpoint, chronic illness patients who have a more positive mindset tend to cope with the situation better, and the healing processes for them are much more smooth and even faster compare to those who don’t have a positive mindset. Reading through the thread about your medical mishap, I am actually impressed by your playfulness and optimistic attitudes which in some ways can be terrifying for most people.

And yes, from the beginning of thread, I could sense the uneasiness between the words of Brenden, and other caring beings. I am sure it was quite a relief for Brenden, your family and other people who cares you to get the news that you are getting better. To be honest, I am really touched by the whole event, and it makes me believe GF is really a place you can seek for a sense of belongingness and contain yourself. :heart:

René wrote:
leleart wrote:I agree with your idea of being a medical practitioner, especially when comes to the situation where psychothearaphies can't have a big help, such as acute psychosis attack or acute schizophrenia. During my internship in a local psychiatric facility, I met a lot of clients (or patients in psychiatric perspective) who were either not receiving proper medication or psychotherapies, which made me think about the collaboration between psychology and psychiatry.

I do think the potential role of psychologists is sometimes underestimated, even in severe illnesses like schizophrenia. Especially when I read articles like this (which I found very interesting):

"When Hearing Voices Is a Good Thing"
"Hallucinatory 'voices' shaped by local culture, Stanford anthropologist says"

It seems to me that psychologists/psychotherapists could play a massive role in improving clinical outcomes by helping patients change their patterns of thought and think about their conditions/symptoms in more constructive ways.

I also recall reading some research showing that schizophrenic patients in developing countries who lack access to antipsychotics have better long-term outcomes than patients treated in the western world using antipsychotics, indicating that while antipsychotics are acutely helpful, chronic use actually worsens the condition. (Which makes sense if you consider that blocking dopamine receptors will simply lead to their expression/density being upregulated — an example of homeostasis.)


You make some interesting point here, and I recalled from my abnormal psychology class that different cultures do shape the manifestation of mental disorders differently. In a religious country, patients do share more “divinity” experience such as hearing oracles from the god or even possession.

I found a journal article that related to Chinese schizophrenic case.
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0020764003049002003 it may require an access.

It is interesting to see how Taoism, Buddhism, and ancestor worship in the Chinese culture that created very distinguish expression of symptom. It also stroke me that when I was doing my internship in local psychiatric unit, I met a few clients diagnosed with short-period dissociative disorder. All of them came from similar social background, female, living in rural area, in their 30-40s, low literacy level, and misfortune family conditions (usually a bad husband). They were all extremely shy and not capable of expressing their own feelings due to low literacy level, and they all showed symptoms of possession. The psychiatry who was in charge had a hypothesis that possession was actually a way for them to express their grudges.

Anyway, you really make a noteworthy point about the role of culture in mental disorders.
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby René » 29 December 2019, 09:59

leleart wrote:It sounds like a much healthier alternative!lol. :D

It is! And I don't care for alcohol anyway; it really bugs me that this incredibly destructive addictive drug (by some measures, the most harmful drug in the world) is legal and even societally encouraged while less harmful drugs that actually have powerful therapeutic uses like cannabis, MDMA and LSD are banned almost everywhere (although this is getting better in some cases).

leleart wrote:It is delighted to know that you have a joyful experience at the hospital, and it also astonished me that what a wonderful mindset you have! From a health psychology standpoint, chronic illness patients who have a more positive mindset tend to cope with the situation better, and the healing processes for them are much more smooth and even faster compare to those who don’t have a positive mindset. Reading through the thread about your medical mishap, I am actually impressed by your playfulness and optimistic attitudes which in some ways can be terrifying for most people.

It may be relevant that over years of using psychedelic drugs like LSD (specifically, legal analogues of LSD) once every 4 weeks (for migraine prophylaxis, for which I've found them 100% effective), I have developed this constant sense that everything is going to be alright. (I suppose that this may have happened subconsciously as a coping mechanism for dealing with the unpredictable feelings and patterns of thought these drugs can cause, but that it carried over into everyday life.) I have also mentally prepared myself for all sorts of terrible scenarios, so for example, if I was told tomorrow that I have cancer and don't have long to live, I won't break down; I'd just try my best to get better and make the most of the time I had left. Similarly, if the rest of my family were to die in a plane crash, I'm ready for that. I was ready when my dad was diagnosed with cancer in 2017 and suffered no excessive emotional consequences. A little brain haemorrhage from which I'm predicted to make a full recovery is like nothing by comparison :lol:

leleart wrote:And yes, from the beginning of thread, I could sense the uneasiness between the words of Brenden, and other caring beings. I am sure it was quite a relief for Brenden, your family and other people who cares you to get the news that you are getting better. To be honest, I am really touched by the whole event, and it makes me believe GF is really a place you can seek for a sense of belongingness and contain yourself. :heart:

Aww, I was very touched too by all the caring messages, and the thread reinforced my feeling of what a precious place we've got going here. :keke:

leleart wrote:You make some interesting point here, and I recalled from my abnormal psychology class that different cultures do shape the manifestation of mental disorders differently. In a religious country, patients do share more “divinity” experience such as hearing oracles from the god or even possession.

I found a journal article that related to Chinese schizophrenic case.
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0020764003049002003 it may require an access.

It is interesting to see how Taoism, Buddhism, and ancestor worship in the Chinese culture that created very distinguish expression of symptom. It also stroke me that when I was doing my internship in local psychiatric unit, I met a few clients diagnosed with short-period dissociative disorder. All of them came from similar social background, female, living in rural area, in their 30-40s, low literacy level, and misfortune family conditions (usually a bad husband). They were all extremely shy and not capable of expressing their own feelings due to low literacy level, and they all showed symptoms of possession. The psychiatry who was in charge had a hypothesis that possession was actually a way for them to express their grudges.

Anyway, you really make a noteworthy point about the role of culture in mental disorders.

Thanks! It is all fascinating stuff that does make me wish I worked in the field (rather than being a translator of (usually boring) corporate documents) — maybe if I'm bored next year I'll take a second degree in Psychology or something :)
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby leleart » 29 December 2019, 13:19

René wrote:Thanks! It is all fascinating stuff that does make me wish I worked in the field (rather than being a translator of (usually boring) corporate documents) — maybe if I'm bored next year I'll take a second degree in Psychology or something :)


It's always a good idea to go back to school, but I guess someone's dosage for migraine pills will go up especially during the paper night or exam-prep week. lol :D At least for me, as I am so glad that I finished my senior seminar course just last week, which require a brief thesis to be qualified for graduation, and I can finally chill myself out a bit and let my stress go away. :awesome:

René wrote:
leleart wrote:It sounds like a much healthier alternative!lol. :D

It is! And I don't care for alcohol anyway; it really bugs me that this incredibly destructive addictive drug (by some measures, the most harmful drug in the world) is legal and even societally encouraged while less harmful drugs that actually have powerful therapeutic uses like cannabis, MDMA and LSD are banned almost everywhere (although this is getting better in some cases).

leleart wrote:It is delighted to know that you have a joyful experience at the hospital, and it also astonished me that what a wonderful mindset you have! From a health psychology standpoint, chronic illness patients who have a more positive mindset tend to cope with the situation better, and the healing processes for them are much more smooth and even faster compare to those who don’t have a positive mindset. Reading through the thread about your medical mishap, I am actually impressed by your playfulness and optimistic attitudes which in some ways can be terrifying for most people.


It may be relevant that over years of using psychedelic drugs like LSD (specifically, legal analogues of LSD) once every 4 weeks (for migraine prophylaxis, for which I've found them 100% effective), I have developed this constant sense that everything is going to be alright. (I suppose that this may have happened subconsciously as a coping mechanism for dealing with the unpredictable feelings and patterns of thought these drugs can cause, but that it carried over into everyday life.) I have also mentally prepared myself for all sorts of terrible scenarios, so for example, if I was told tomorrow that I have cancer and don't have long to live, I won't break down; I'd just try my best to get better and make the most of the time I had left. Similarly, if the rest of my family were to die in a plane crash, I'm ready for that. I was ready when my dad was diagnosed with cancer in 2017 and suffered no excessive emotional consequences. A little brain haemorrhage from which I'm predicted to make a full recovery is like nothing by comparison :lol:


It is so interesting to be always prepared and accepting towards death, and for myself, I think it takes some time for me to finally figure it out and be able to comprehend it mindfully. Also, I feel so relateble to your life philosophy I'd just try my best to get better and make the most of the time I had left., which I am trying to practice it in my life as well.

Well, I agree your idea that alcohol is a underestimated but dangerously destructive drug, but personally I am more cautiously optimistic about the pharmacological effect of substances like LSD and MDMA. There are tons of research about the extraordinary effect of psychotropic drugs in clinical trials in recent years, but the concern for the issues like addiction and serious physiological consequences should be addressed carefully as well. Still, resesrchers should definately dig more into this area which I firmly believe will potentially lead to the new generation antipsychotic, antidepressent, and etc.

For your interest, last year there is a phenomenal research output from Zhejiang University in China about how Ketamine can be a rapid treatment for depression. Basically, the researcher discorved a new neurochemical mechanism behind depression by applying Ketamine. To my astonishment, the researchers from this team are so young, who are around my age, and they can make such a inspiring discovery. You may find more information in the link below.

https://www.zju.edu.cn/english/2018/0212/c19573a811165/page.htm

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/getting-the-inside-dope-on-ketamine-rsquo-s-mysterious-ability-to-rapidly-relieve-depression/

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckeq-dGmpmk[/youtube]
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Re: Hello from Orient

Unread postby René » 29 December 2019, 15:31

leleart wrote:Well, I agree your idea that alcohol is a underestimated but dangerously destructive drug, but personally I am more cautiously optimistic about the pharmacological effect of substances like LSD and MDMA. There are tons of research about the extraordinary effect of psychotropic drugs in clinical trials in recent years, but the concern for the issues like addiction and serious physiological consequences should be addressed carefully as well.

It's definitely encouraging to see a lot more research taking place in this area (I actually contributed to a crowd-funder for one such study), but what a lot of people don't realise is that psychedelic drugs like LSD aren't addictive and actually have anti-addictive effects that can help people quit other drugs like alcohol and tobacco. There is even one, ibogaine, that is extremely effective in cases of opioid addiction.

Psychedelics actually have a built-in anti-addiction mechanism whereby if you try to use them two days in a row, even if it's a different psychedelic drug each day, there will be no or almost no effect. There is a profound, immediate tolerance that can last for weeks. So there's no point in trying to trip, e.g., even every weekend. It just doesn't work. (And I suspect that that tolerance, likely involving 5-HT2A/2C receptor internalisation, is actually part of the anti-migraine mechanism, since the prophylactic effect against migraines also lasts for weeks after the exposure.)

leleart wrote:For your interest, last year there is a phenomenal research output from Zhejiang University in China about how Ketamine can be a rapid treatment for depression. Basically, the researcher discorved a new neurochemical mechanism behind depression by applying Ketamine. To my astonishment, the researchers from this team are so young, who are around my age, and they can make such a inspiring discovery. You may find more information in the link below.

https://www.zju.edu.cn/english/2018/0212/c19573a811165/page.htm

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/getting-the-inside-dope-on-ketamine-rsquo-s-mysterious-ability-to-rapidly-relieve-depression/

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckeq-dGmpmk[/youtube]

Thanks for linking me to that! I am familiar with the rapid antidepressant effect of NMDA receptor antagonists like ketamine and have witnessed it for myself when treating my husband (who suffers from treatment-resistant depression) with one such agent which is orally active (diphenidine) that I acquired for him and was not at the time subject to any legal controls. He continues to take this every 12 days, and the effect is indeed very rapid and long-lasting. We've found an interval of 12 days to be ideal in his case. There has been some dose escalation over the years, but it remains very effective (not enough to put him into remission, though; that took an MAOI, tranylcypromine).
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René
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