Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby Mod » 6 September 2014, 18:25

I think I've earner the right to go slightly off topic here.
One of my great annoyances with current adult contemporary is that they're all filled with murders, plots, and escapism anyway. I want more cool stories getting stuck into adult life rather than trying for 'adult' versions of YA power fantasies. Less Robert Langdon more Coen Bros.
I really hope that very soon our own generation will hav grown up enough to produce great novels about growing old in a world where people are resigned to view hope as a sham, to cease buying into the lie that our lives will soon become better and more fulfilling as we enter a competitive workforce and hope that by retirement we'll actually have enough to live comfortably without yet another world crisis and economic shortage on our hands. Something that accepts that what people need to hear about isn't the fake lives of non existent executives as they try to relive Mad Men and travel to faux exotic locations but to read about people, adults, teens as the people we are or might become as we all grow disillusioned between what we want to achieve hat we can 'realistically' achieve and the changing tread milling landscape of what ways to achieve are offered to us. I want the bleak, I want the ambiguous, I want the coping with disillusionment, I want my heroes to live with and shape their lives around compromise of shifting narratives and realities and even baselines for whic to judge ones personal success.
Because everything else sounds so fucking trivial and childish that I'm ceasing to care about it.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby homomorphism » 7 September 2014, 14:22

Derek wrote:I feel like people have stopped reading the OP.

You should have included a dragon or some wizards in the OP
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby Iago » 7 September 2014, 15:11

I'm surprised nobody has brought up either Doctor Who or the Disney movies yet.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby homomorphism » 7 September 2014, 16:29

I'm surprised nobody has brought up either Doctor Who or the Disney movies yet.


You mean as examples of children's entertainment that appeals to a broader audience?
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby poolerboy0077 » 7 September 2014, 17:50

homomorphism wrote:
I'm surprised nobody has brought up either Doctor Who or the Disney movies yet.


You mean as examples of children's entertainment that appeals to a broader audience?

Where would a book like this fall under?




So I'm curious, guys. What do your parents read? Is it embarrassing?
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby Derek » 7 September 2014, 20:59

poolerboy0077 wrote:So I'm curious, guys. What do your parents read? Is it embarrassing?

My dad only reads books about classical and Roman history and my mom hasn't read a book in probably over ten years.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby Iago » 7 September 2014, 22:20

homomorphism wrote:
I'm surprised nobody has brought up either Doctor Who or the Disney movies yet.


You mean as examples of children's entertainment that appeals to a broader audience?

Yes. We've been talking mainly about literature so far, but it's just as prevalent in TV and cinema.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby Mod » 7 September 2014, 23:39

poolerboy0077 wrote:So I'm curious, guys. What do your parents read? Is it embarrassing?


I don't remember what she's reading now but she'll read anything from Stieg Larson to The Letters of Marcillio Ficino, to Marcus Aurelius, to Snowboarding to Nirvana, to Eckhart Tolle, to Wolfe Hall to The Poisonwood Bible, to Catholic Art, to Dan Brown .
She enjoyed The luminaries and Who Will Run The Frog Hospital. Both being books I got her to read.

Dad read a lot of Vonnegut Jr, a whole swathe of film books both industry and technical focused, he read The Gambler, 100 Days of Solitude, Grapes of wrath, some john waters autobiographies, that Marlon Brando autobiography, Edward Debono's thinking hats, oh and he also had several books on magic ley lines which I found very funny - though I guess that's par for course when you're a man so self obsessed that you believe your dreams to be the result of your third eye opening to explore the cosmos with. Fun Fact, The Underwater Melon Man had a few veiled references to Eckankar.

But while I grew up with him he'd largely turned off reading for pleasure. He'd read Mac Addict, Rich Dad Poor Dad, a bunch of books on getting rich with eBay/Trademe and (a rare sight) Shantaram.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby 1day » 8 September 2014, 12:45

Derek wrote:The reaction to the article has been overwhelmingly negative, variously casting Graham as snobbish and condescending or accusing her of mischaracterizing the larger body of young-adult fiction. So the question is, do you think adults should be embarrassed to read this stuff?


If it's the core of what an adult reads, then yes they should be embarrassed. However, if it's limited to something like Harry Potter, then it's more of an anomaly. On a side note, I think you have to take into consideration how books in general have been dumbed down which speaks to the larger climate of our degrading American education system and society.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby homomorphism » 8 September 2014, 21:30

Iago wrote:
homomorphism wrote:
I'm surprised nobody has brought up either Doctor Who or the Disney movies yet.


You mean as examples of children's entertainment that appeals to a broader audience?

Yes. We've been talking mainly about literature so far, but it's just as prevalent in TV and cinema.

As someone who powerfully dislikes Dr. Who, I think it'd be best for my safety if I didn't share my opinion on that show.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby poolerboy0077 » 9 September 2014, 00:51

homomorphism wrote:
Iago wrote:
homomorphism wrote:
I'm surprised nobody has brought up either Doctor Who or the Disney movies yet.


You mean as examples of children's entertainment that appeals to a broader audience?

Yes. We've been talking mainly about literature so far, but it's just as prevalent in TV and cinema.

As someone who powerfully dislikes Dr. Who, I think it'd be best for my safety if I didn't share my opinion on that show.

I thought I was the only one.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby Derek » 9 September 2014, 01:46

I have expressed my dislike for Doctor Who in the Doctor Who threads. Several times.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby poolerboy0077 » 9 September 2014, 02:04

Derek wrote:I have expressed my dislike for Doctor Who in the Doctor Who threads. Several times.

I've yet to set foot in there.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby Derek » 9 September 2014, 02:40

I do every time my contempt for British television reaches a boiling point.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby homomorphism » 9 September 2014, 05:35

I just try to pretend British television doesn't exist and disassociate myself with anyone who mentions that they're a Whovian or whatever it is they call themselves.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby Mod » 9 September 2014, 05:37

The Thick of It exists.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby shadow_x » 9 September 2014, 07:13

I don't think adults should be embarrassed about reading books aimed for teens. While the topics maybe predominantly teen based, the themes of love, life, and death are universal and apply to all. I think these books can offer something to adults and teens a like. I haven't read the Perks of Being a Wallflower, but the movie resonated with me a lot. When I was in university, my past time was going to the library and reading the Newbery Medal books and books aimed for gay youth. It was a time of self discovery for me. So no, I don't see anything bad about reading teen literature.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby Josh » 9 September 2014, 12:25

homomorphism wrote:Whovian.

I love Doctor Who but can't stand this word. I guess the same stands for 'Bronie', 'Little Monsters' or any of the other sort of fan collective words.

homomorphism wrote:I just try to pretend British television doesn't exist.

With a handful of exceptions, most of which are now from the Nineties (America knew how to do good sci-fi/fantasy), I tend to do the same for American television.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby homomorphism » 11 September 2014, 19:03

Szazomy wrote:
homomorphism wrote:I just try to pretend British television doesn't exist.

With a handful of exceptions, most of which are now from the Nineties (America knew how to do good sci-fi/fantasy), I tend to do the same for American television.


I can see that. American television has this tendency to focus on being believable, having interesting and dynamic characters and character relationships, and just has a general effort that goes into the writing that I imagine is distasteful for fans of Dr. Who.
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Re: Should adults be embarrassed to read young-adult fiction?

Unread postby Josh » 11 September 2014, 23:17

homomorphism wrote:
Szazomy wrote:
homomorphism wrote:I just try to pretend British television doesn't exist.

With a handful of exceptions, most of which are now from the Nineties (America knew how to do good sci-fi/fantasy), I tend to do the same for American television.


I can see that. American television has this tendency to focus on being believable, having interesting and dynamic characters and character relationships, and just has a general effort that goes into the writing that I imagine is distasteful for fans of Dr. Who.

I see no correlation with British and American TV in terms of the quality of character-driven writing. Both have produced solid shows, and both have produced a much larger amount of shit. Doctor Who was (in my opinion) better a few years ago when it was more character driven, not that I consider a good example of decent British television.
But British shows tend to have a harder job of developing characters. They usually have a lot less episodes to work with (6-12 episodes a series, as opposed to the US's typical 18-24 episodes) and also can't usually rely on ensemble casts which flit between loads of different characters.
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