Article of the Moment

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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby aceasarsalad » 3 November 2014, 20:14

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omg that article again. It lives to haunt me! LOL
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby Muspelli » 22 January 2015, 21:21

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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby Brenden » 10 April 2018, 10:55

Incivility at Work: Is 'Queen Bee Syndrome' Getting Worse?
Women report more incivility experiences at work than men, but who is at fault for instigating these mildly deviant behaviors? One UA researcher set out to answer that question, with surprising results.
Participants also were asked to complete trait inventories of their personalities and behaviors to determine if there were any factors that contributed to women being treated uncivilly. The research showed that women who defied gender norms by being more assertive and dominant at work were more likely to be targeted by their female counterparts, compared to women who exhibited fewer of those traits.

The researchers also found that when men acted assertive and warm — in general, not considered the norm for male behavior — they reported lower incivility from their male counterparts. This suggests men actually get a social credit for partially deviating from their gender stereotypes, a benefit that women are not afforded.


Repeat it with me: Women police gender roles.
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby PopTart » 10 April 2018, 11:43

Brenden wrote:Incivility at Work: Is 'Queen Bee Syndrome' Getting Worse?
Women report more incivility experiences at work than men, but who is at fault for instigating these mildly deviant behaviors? One UA researcher set out to answer that question, with surprising results.
Participants also were asked to complete trait inventories of their personalities and behaviors to determine if there were any factors that contributed to women being treated uncivilly. The research showed that women who defied gender norms by being more assertive and dominant at work were more likely to be targeted by their female counterparts, compared to women who exhibited fewer of those traits.

The researchers also found that when men acted assertive and warm — in general, not considered the norm for male behavior — they reported lower incivility from their male counterparts. This suggests men actually get a social credit for partially deviating from their gender stereotypes, a benefit that women are not afforded.


Repeat it with me: Women police gender roles.

This doesn't surprise me, I listened to a conversation at the coffee shop the other day, betweena group of women, one of whom expressed that she wanted to quit work and be a stay at home wife and mother when her baby was born. The other women had nothing kind to say on the matter and honestly, were brutally judgemental and horrible towards her, because, as they put it, she was re-inforcing a negative sterotype of women as domsticated house wives, a choice they felt was invalid and didn't support the narrative of women being empowered and equal or better than men (one woman actually stated her belief that this was true) They called her names and pretty much bullied her.

The irony being, that true feminists, who went on marches and burned bra's to give women the right to choose their direction in life, would likely be appaled to hear that other women now dictate what choices other women make with that hard won liberty.

I'd commend the woman if she stuck to her desire to be a stay at home mum, regardless of what her peers said. It is the right to make ones own choices that women of hte past fought for, modern day feminists believe that women, all women, should make the same choices they would and any other is invalid or unacceptable :confused: I've watched women at work pour hatred on other women who dare to succeed or have better figures or make choices they wouldn't or couldn't, it can often come out of nowhere and it puts to shame the same kind of sentiment some men feel towards other men or even women.
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby Mod » 25 June 2018, 11:45

Stop Trying to Sell the Humanities
Arguments that they’re useful are wrong, anti-humanistic, and sure to backfire


Extremely long link to dodge a paywall.

Now I'd say that this article buries it's major points but two things stand out.

I hate to be the one to tell you, but there is no generalizable benefit to having led a life centered on great texts. It is sometimes thought that those whose careers are spent engaging with beautiful and stringent works of literature and philosophy will become, perhaps by osmosis, better persons than they otherwise would have been. Anyone who believes that hasn’t spent much time in English and philosophy departments.


A less suspect version of the "democracy needs us" argument involves the claim that students who spend four years engaging with complex, nuanced texts will emerge as potentially better citizens than those who have not had that experience. This is really the same specious argument, made less obviously silly by the fact that it is students and not arrogant faculty members who are at its center. But good citizenship and the knowledge required both to achieve and implement it are not taught exclusively by colleges and universities; those who end their formal education at the 12th grade can still manage to acquire and act on an understanding of civic duty. Moreover, and this is the central point, good citizenship is an occasional byproduct of what happens in a college classroom; it is not — or should not be — the chief aim of those who preside over that classroom, and it is at least curious to defend an enterprise by pointing to one of its unintentional effects.

So is there anything left once the justifications I have surveyed prove to be at best partial and at worse delusional? Well, what’s left is the position articulated by Oakeshott, a position I have always held, a position Small names the "intrinsic value" or "for its own sake" position. This position has the great advantage not of providing a justification but of making a virtue of the unavailability of one. Justification is always a mug’s game, for it involves a surrender to some measure or criterion external to the humanities. The person or persons who ask us as academic humanists to justify what we do is asking us to justify what we do in his terms, not ours. Once we pick up that challenge, we have lost the game, because we are playing on the other guy’s court, where all the advantage and all of the relevant arguments and standards of evidence are his. The justification of the humanities is not only an impossible task but an unworthy one, because to engage in it is to acknowledge, if only implicitly, that the humanities cannot stand on their own and do not on their own have an independent value. Of course the assertion of an independent value and the refusal to attach that value to any external good bring us back to the public-relations question: How are we going to sell this? The answer is. again, that we can’t.
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby René » 10 April 2019, 20:47

NewsThump wrote:Scientists release first ever image of Brexit

A clear-ish image of Brexit has been captured for the first time – and the massive shit storm, measuring 40 billion km across (three million times bigger than Earth), has been described by scientists as “a monster”.

The picture shows a halo of hot air and lost jobs and traces the outline of a massive financial black hole.

Brexit itself – a toxic hell from which neither truth nor the Conservative party can escape – is itself, unseeable. But the newly released picture at least takes us to its insane threshold for the first time, showing the cosmic cliff edge beyond which all known political, economic and social rules break down.

Said professor Simon Williams: “Brexit is one the most mysterious objects in the known universe. We have now seen what we thought was unthinkable. And frankly, I am now crapping myself.”

The picture gives us the first direct look at Brexit’s ‘accretion disk’ – a fuzzy doughnut-shaped ring of gas and crap from the ERG that “feeds” the lurking monster.

At Brexit’s event horizon, light bends in a perfect loop, meaning if you stood there you would literally be able to see the back of your head – and the back of the whole country.

Time is also said to move differently around it, which may explain why so many Brexiters are fixated on a war that ended over seventy years ago. To them, it might seem like only yesterday.

When asked why the image of Brexit looked so fuzzy, Professor Williams said: “I’m baffled frankly. It’s not what we were told to expect at all.”
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby Brenden » 15 February 2020, 23:37

Psychiatric Comorbidity of Gender Identity Disorders: A Survey Among Dutch Psychiatrists
OBJECTIVE: In the Netherlands, it is considered good medical practice to offer patients with gender identity disorder the option to undergo hormonal and surgical sex reassignment therapy. A liberalization of treatment guidelines now allows for such treatment to be started at puberty or prepuberty. The question arises as to what extent gender identity disorder can be reliably distinguished from a cross-gender identification that is secondary to other psychiatric disorders. METHOD: The authors sent survey questionnaires to 382 board-certified Dutch psychiatrists regarding their experiences with diagnosing and treating patients with gender identity disorder. RESULTS: One hundred eighty-six psychiatrists responded to the survey. These respondents reported on 584 patients with cross-gender identification. In 225 patients (39%), gender identity disorder was regarded as the primary diagnosis. For the remaining 359 patients (61%), cross-gender identification was comorbid with other psychiatric disorders. In 270 (75%) of these 359 patients, cross-gender identification was interpreted as an epiphenomenon of other psychiatric illnesses, notably personality, mood, dissociative, and psychotic disorders. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that there is little consensus, at least among Dutch psychiatrists, about diagnostic features of gender identity disorder or about the minimum age at which sex reassignment therapy is a safe option. Therapy options proposed to patients with gender identity disorder appear to depend on personal preferences of psychiatrists. These results underline the need for more specific diagnostic rules in this area.
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby poolerboy0077 » 22 February 2020, 15:50

The radical moral implications of luck in human life

[...]

How much moral credit are we due for where we end up in life, and for who we end up? Conversely, how much responsibility or blame do we deserve? I don’t just mean Kylie Jenner or Donald Trump — all of us. Anyone.

How you answer these questions reveals a great deal about your moral worldview. To a first approximation, the more credit/responsibility you believe we are due, the more you will be inclined to accept default (often cruel and inequitable) social and economic outcomes. People basically get what they deserve.

The less credit/responsibility you believe we are due, the more you believe our trajectories are shaped by forces outside our control (and sheer chance), the more compassionate you will be toward failure and the more you will expect back from the fortunate. When luck is recognized, softening its harsh effects becomes the basic moral project.

[...]

So, then, here you are. You turn 18. You are no longer a child; you are an adult, a moral agent, responsible for who you are and what you do.

By that time, your inheritance is enormous. You’ve not only been granted a genetic makeup, an ethnicity and appearance, by accidents of nature and parentage. You’ve also had your latent genetic traits “activated” in a very specific way through a specific upbringing, in a specific environment, with a specific set of experiences.

Your basic mental and emotional wiring is in place; you have certain instincts, predilections, fears, and cravings. You have a certain amount of money, certain social connections and opportunities, a certain family lineage. You’ve had a certain amount and quality of education. You’re a certain kind of person.

You are not responsible for any of that stuff; you weren’t yet capable of being responsible. You were just a kid (or worse, a teen). You didn’t choose your genes or your experiences. Both nature and the vast bulk of the nurture that matters happened to you.

[...]

Acknowledging luck — or, more broadly, the pervasive influence on our lives of factors we did not choose and for which we deserve no credit or blame — does not mean denying all agency. It doesn’t mean people are nothing more than the sum of their inheritances, or that merit has no role in outcomes. It doesn’t mean people shouldn’t be held responsible for bad things they do or rewarded for good things. Nor does it necessarily mean going full socialist. These are all familiar straw men in this debate.

No, it just means that no one “deserves” hunger, homelessness, ill health, or subjugation — and ultimately, no one “deserves” giant fortunes either. All such outcomes involve a large portion of luck.

[....]


I’m sure this is bound to trigger mxguy01 into a fit of Boomer rage and further entitlement.
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby James M » 22 April 2020, 22:27

Coronavirus pandemic 'will cause famine of biblical proportions'

According to a report produced by the UN and other organisations on Thursday, at least 265 million people are being pushed to the brink of starvation by the Covid-19 crisis, double the number under threat before the pandemic.

This one certainly made for an interesting read, albeit massively disconcerting. I would urge anyone to read it, at the very least to raise awareness of the massive implications Covid-19 is going to have in terms of starvation, as in my experience I haven't seen this subject get much media coverage.
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby Brenden » 23 April 2020, 01:11

^ This black swan is just getting blacker and swan-ier.
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby James M » 23 April 2020, 01:25

Brenden wrote:^ This black swan is just getting blacker and swan-ier.

It does pose the question though, as to how much any of this could have been predicted. Perhaps not the pandemic itself, but there has been plenty of studies into global and national preparedness for such a turn of events. Unfortunately, despite this I think we'd have found ourselves in dire circumstances even if we were somewhat better equipped to deal with this.

Also, I've never seen the film.
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby Brenden » 23 April 2020, 08:22

James M wrote:
Brenden wrote:^ This black swan is just getting blacker and swan-ier.

It does pose the question though, as to how much any of this could have been predicted. Perhaps not the pandemic itself, but there has been plenty of studies into global and national preparedness for such a turn of events. Unfortunately, despite this I think we'd have found ourselves in dire circumstances even if we were somewhat better equipped to deal with this.

Also, I've never seen the film.

Oh, it’s not really a reference to the movie, the term is older than the ballet Swan Lake.
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby James M » 23 April 2020, 08:30

Brenden wrote:
James M wrote:
Brenden wrote:^ This black swan is just getting blacker and swan-ier.

It does pose the question though, as to how much any of this could have been predicted. Perhaps not the pandemic itself, but there has been plenty of studies into global and national preparedness for such a turn of events. Unfortunately, despite this I think we'd have found ourselves in dire circumstances even if we were somewhat better equipped to deal with this.

Also, I've never seen the film.

Oh, it’s not really a reference to the movie, the term is older than the ballet Swan Lake.

Haha I got that, poor attempt at humour on my part :facepalm2:
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby Magic J » 27 April 2020, 00:44

https://www.wonkette.com/qanon-idiots-v ... ildren-now

Leaving this here. Yeah yeah, easy target and all that, whatever.

Mole children... Honestly. Fucking idiots. It's the Illuminati they should really be worried about. :facepalm2:
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby poolerboy0077 » 5 June 2020, 21:58

Imagining the Lives of Others

[...]

Many believe that this psychological connection is also essential for political change. They may argue, for instance, that in order for white Americans to adequately respond to the events in Baltimore, Ferguson, Mo., and elsewhere, they need to put themselves in the shoes of those in minority communities. After the death of Eric Garner at the hands of New York City police officers, Hillary Rodham Clinton called for changing police tactics, and then added: “The most important thing each of us can do is to try even harder to see the world through our neighbors’ eyes, to imagine what it is like to walk in their shoes, to share their pain and their hopes and their dreams.”

This is a moral claim, but it raises a psychological question. Can we do what Mrs. Clinton asks of us? Just how successful are we at seeing the world as others see it?

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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby poolerboy0077 » 11 June 2020, 15:33

If we want better policing, we’re going to have to spend more, not less

Washington Post wrote:[...]

One inevitable result of radically uneven law enforcement is suspicion of cops in communities subject to the heaviest policing. Perhaps less predictably, ever more aggressive penalties aren’t even a very good way to lower crime. As Kleiman pointed out in his book, “When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment,” unlikely but extra-severe punishment doesn’t much alter criminal behavior because perpetrators don’t expect to get caught. The decades of attempting to solve soaring crime rates with escalating harshness were not just a humanitarian disaster but also a policy failure; we could have gotten better results with milder punishments applied more consistently.

Keep that in mind as we push forward with police reform, because to control police brutality, we do need to control crime. Too often, such reforms follow a vicious cycle: a justifiably outraged public demands that police be brought to heel, new policies and restrictions are put in place, cops pull back from active policing out of either anger or a genuine fear that any mistake could cost them their jobs, and crime rises, so a frightened public demands greater law enforcement.

[...]
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby Brenden » 29 June 2020, 12:59

On “White Fragility”
A few thoughts on America’s smash-hit #1 guide to egghead racialism

Matt Taibbi wrote:DiAngelo’s writing style is pure pain. The lexicon favored by intersectional theorists of this type is built around the same principles as Orwell’s Newspeak: it banishes ambiguity, nuance, and feeling and structures itself around sterile word pairs, like racist and antiracist, platform and deplatform, center and silence, that reduce all thinking to a series of binary choices. Ironically, Donald Trump does something similar, only with words like “AMAZING!” and “SAD!” that are simultaneously more childish and livelier.
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby Brenden » 29 June 2020, 13:25

Can We Pull Back From The Brink?
Sam Harris wrote:[…]

In a city like Los Angeles, 2019 was a 30-year low for police shootings. Think about that…. Do the people who were protesting in Los Angeles, peacefully and violently, do the people who were ransacking and burning businesses by the hundreds—in many cases, businesses that will not return to their neighborhoods—do the people who caused so much damage to the city, that certain neighborhoods, ironically the neighborhoods that are disproportionately black, will take years, probably decades to recover, do the celebrities who supported them, and even bailed them out of jail—do any of these people know that 2019 was the 30-year low for police shootings in Los Angeles?

[…]

The main problem with using individual cases, where black men and women have been killed by cops, to conclude that there is an epidemic of racist police violence in our society, is that you can find nearly identical cases of white suspects being killed by cops, and there are actually more of them.

In 2016, John McWhorter wrote a piece in Time Magazine about this.

Here’s a snippet of what he wrote:

“The heart of the indignation over these murders is a conviction that racist bias plays a decisive part in these encounters. That has seemed plausible to me, and I have recently challenged those who disagree to present a list of white people killed within the past few years under circumstances similar to those that so enrage us in cases such as what happened to Tamir Rice, John Crawford, Walter Scott, Sam Debose, and others.”

So, McWhorter issued that challenge, as he said, and he was presented with the cases [VIDEO, VIDEO, VIDEO]. But there’s no song about these people, admonishing us to say their names. And the list of white names is longer, and I don’t know any of them, other than Tony Timpa. I know the black names. In addition to the ones I just read from McWhorter’s article, I know the names of Eric Garner, and Michael Brown, and Alton Sterling, and Philando Castile, and now, of course, I know the name of George Floyd. And I’m aware of many of the details of these cases where black men and women have been killed by cops. I know the name of Breonna Taylor. I can’t name a single white person killed by cops in circumstances like these—other than Timpa—and I just read McWhorter’s article where he lists many of them.

So, this is also a distortion in the media. The media is not showing us videos of white people being killed by cops; activists are not demanding that they do this. I’m sure white supremacists talk about this stuff a lot, who knows? But in terms of the story we’re telling ourselves in the mainstream, we are not actually talking about the data on lethal police violence.

So back to the data: Again, cops kill around 1000 people every year in the United States. About 25 percent are black. About 50 percent are white. The data on police homicide are all over the place. The federal government does not have a single repository for data of this kind. But they have been pretty carefully tracked by outside sources, like the Washington Post, for the last 5 years. These ratios appear stable over time. Again, many of these killings are justifiable, we’re talking about career criminals who are often armed and, in many cases, trying to kill the cops. Those aren’t the cases we’re worried about. We’re worried about the unjustifiable homicides.

Now, some people will think that these numbers still represent an outrageous injustice. Afterall, African Americans are only 13 percent of the population. So, at most, they should be 13 percent of the victims of police violence, not 25 percent. Any departure from the baseline population must be due to racism.

Ok. Well, that sounds plausible, but consider a few more facts:

Blacks are 13 percent of the population, but they commit at least 50 percent of the murders and other violent crimes.

If you have 13 percent of the population responsible for 50 percent of the murders—and in some cities committing 2/3rds of all violent crime—what percent of police attention should it attract? I don’t know. But I’m pretty sure it’s not just 13 percent. Given that the overwhelming majority of their victims are black, I’m pretty sure that most black people wouldn’t set the dial at 13 percent either.

[…] But, as far as I know, the best data we have suggest that for, whatever reason, whites are more likely to be killed by cops once an arrest is attempted. And a more recent study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by David Johnson and colleagues found similar results. And it is simply undeniable that more whites are killed by cops each year, both in absolute numbers and in proportion to their contributions to crime and violence in our society.
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby Sullivan » 29 June 2020, 15:06

The weekend these protests and riots were kicking off nationwide—when our entire country seemed to be tearing itself apart over a perceived epidemic of racist police violence against the black community, 92 people were shot, and 27 killed, in Chicago alone—one city. This is almost entirely a story of black men killing members of their own community. And this is far more representative of the kind of violence that the black community needs to worry about. And, ironically, it’s clear that one remedy for this violence is, or would be, effective policing.

It seems to me that effective policing could only "ironically" be the solution if he takes effective policing to be other than the aim of the protesters he rails against throughout the piece. But effective policing, in the form of radical overhaul of existing institutions, is exactly what I take protesters to be demanding.

And all of his related, uncritical parroting of "black-on-black" crime statistics doesn't seem to consider the cyclicity of such phenomena—over-policing of black communities creates more crime which, in turn, justifies more over-policing—that, again, gets you back to dismantling irreparably racist institutions rather than just, like, banning chokeholds.

The George Floyd video, while even more disturbing to watch, is harder to interpret. I don’t know anything about Derek Chauvin, the cop who knelt on his neck. It’s quite possible that he’s a terrible person who should have never been a cop. He seems to have a significant number of complaints against him—though, as far as I know, the details of those complaints haven’t been released. And he might be a racist on top of being a bad cop. Or he might be a guy who was totally in over his head and thought you could restrain someone indefinitely by keeping a knee on their neck indefinitely. I don’t know. I’m sure more facts will come out. But whoever he is, I find it very unlikely that he was intending to kill George Floyd. Think about it. He was surrounded by irate witnesses and being filmed. Unless he was aspiring to become the most notorious murderer in human history, it seems very unlikely that he was intending to commit murder in that moment. It’s possible, of course. But it doesn’t seem the likeliest explanation for his behavior. What I believe we saw on that video was the result of a tragic level of negligence and poor training on the part of those cops.


I don't get what he's trying to do here. It's like he wants to prove that racism could only be a factor in Floyd's death if hard evidence existed that Chauvin harbored racist views. But obviously the kind of gross negligence Chauvin displayed can be the product of a latent societal racism that acculturates one to a complete disregard for black lives. Racism can be a factor even if you want to argue that it's not rising to the level of individual consciousness and intent.

There just seems like a complete disconnect throughout the entire piece from the reality of our situation, stemming from a desire to dismiss identitarian politics out of hand rather than engage with them in good faith, which is honestly exactly the kind of thing you can expect to happen when you make a neuroscience PhD out to be some enlightened prognosticator of society's ills. It's social criticism for Bay Area technocrats.
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Re: Article of the Moment

Unread postby Brenden » 29 June 2020, 15:20

Sullivan wrote:over-policing of black communities creates more crime

wat

[citation needed]

You say this as if it's a given. By what mechanism does "over-policing" create more crime? It certainly finds more crime, but how does it create more crime?

Sullivan wrote:I don't get what he's trying to do here. It's like he wants to prove that racism could only be a factor in Floyd's death if hard evidence existed that Chauvin harbored racist views. But obviously the kind of gross negligence Chauvin displayed can be the product of a latent societal racism that acculturates one to a complete disregard for black lives. Racism can be a factor even if you want to argue that it's not rising to the level of individual consciousness and intent.

But the same thing — in fact, worse, because a whole group of pigs were cracking jokes — happened to a white man.

I think the fact of the matter is that, to American police, no one's lives but their own matter. Ironic that they use the phrase "all lives matter" when they have such disregard for human life.
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