Should lying about age on the Internet be a crime?

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Should lying about age on the Internet be a crime?

Unread postby Gay-paul » 29 November 2018, 17:44

Does Lying About Age On Internet Should Be Crime?

The government of my country wants to start to bring kids for false information, lying about age, adult sites and social media into court?

The government of my country wants to start to bring kids for false information, lying about age, adult sites and social media into court?

Do not you think it's an exaggeration. :-)

We have the same age limit for for social media as USA, it's just coincidence.

But to watch porn you need to be at least 18. porn is bad for kids I can not disagree with it, i'm 32 years old, but when i was young in my country (Poland) they Internet in my country was new thing, and so on law regarding too internet, we don't have pornhub but we watch porn picture, and every time until o finished 18 years old i just clicked that i'm 18 and was in no biggie :-)
Now they have make it more protected, like need to create an account.

But many kids on porn sites and facebook just provide false information.

but now our governments,
Our government began to do social campaigns targeting teenagers and their parents, reminding us that according to our law, "giving no real data to gain access to someone else's IT system is a crime" :-)

And that such kids put themselves and their friends in danger.
This is a crime from the hacker category, so far no child has been brought to justice for this, but some say that it is time to start enforcing this law!
Last edited by Brenden on 29 November 2018, 18:39, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: Fixed title gore. Removed link.
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Re: Should lying about age on the Internet be a crime?

Unread postby PopTart » 29 November 2018, 19:31

Honestly, I kinda understand where their coming from and it doesn't just protect kids but also, adults, who may not realise they are talking to kids.

Lets face it, many of us (not all, but many) have shared pics with people, explicit pics, hell I've posted here, but how certain are we, that the person on the other end, is actually really the age they claim, On either side of the divide, kids might be sharing this stuff, with people they think are their age and people our age, might be unknowingly sharing things with kids, who out of curiousity and an eagerness to grow up, might be willing to mislead.

Perhaps, the legislation that has been proposed in Poland is too draconian or not of the right nature, for the purpose, but I think, the purpose atleast, comes from a good place.

I don't have the answer, as to how to deal with the problem, I've described above, but all I can say, is that I'd be horrified to learn someone I might have been speaking to, was underage, even more so to then face legal action as a result. kids can't be held responsbile in some ways, because they aparantly don't know any better, but that wouldn't be the case for someone who has been misled into believing something that was false and I would die to think I'd be labeled something I wasn't for the disception of a minor.
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Re: Should lying about age on the Internet be a crime?

Unread postby acpro » 29 November 2018, 20:10

It's all about context!
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Re: Should lying about age on the Internet be a crime?

Unread postby BlackBoi666 » 1 December 2018, 07:20

Yes. So there will be less kids tricking adults.
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Re: Should lying about age on the Internet be a crime?

Unread postby Gay-paul » 1 December 2018, 17:18

BlackBoi666 wrote:Yes. So there will be less kids tricking adults.


But why punish kids, I think the adults should be punished for hurting those kids, the pervs are the problem :(
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Re: Should lying about age on the Internet be a crime?

Unread postby PopTart » 1 December 2018, 17:44

As I said, perhaps punishment isn't the right way to go about it, but there has to be a drive to make young people understand, the danger they place themselves AND others in, by misleading about their age.

The internet is hard to police, so I cant really see how it would realistically work anyway.

Behaving as if young people can do no harm, doesn't invest in them a sense of responsibility for their actions. Quite the opposite.
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Re: Should lying about age on the Internet be a crime?

Unread postby mxguy01 » 1 December 2018, 18:14

As Poptart points out incarceration, exceptional circumstances excluded, is the wrong way to go about that.

Also, having kids I was was involved in youth organizations. The one thing you get explained to you as the adult is to never put yourself into that situation. In those kinds of situations you call that two deep - never be alone with someone underage. Never put yourself into that position and you won't have to deal with nasty/false accusations. Put yourself into such a situation, and well, your problem too!

So as to the specifics of lying about age - well all I can say is understand the laws and be cautious. Starting there is a minimum.
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Re: Should lying about age on the Internet be a crime?

Unread postby Gay-paul » 1 December 2018, 19:08

PopTart wrote:As I said, perhaps punishment isn't the right way to go about it, but there has to be a drive to make young people understand, the danger they place themselves AND others in, by misleading about their age.

The internet is hard to police, so I cant really see how it would realistically work anyway.

Behaving as if young people can do no harm, doesn't invest in them a sense of responsibility for their actions. Quite the opposite.


But making criminal sanction on it would not help either, doing a social campaign is one thing but making it criminal offence is the other.
Fortunately, this is just a draft law, of an overzealous right-wing politician (I am a rightist myself) who with great probability will not go out of the first reading stage in the Sejn (our parliament)
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Re: Should lying about age on the Internet be a crime?

Unread postby PandaBoo » 28 September 2019, 21:35

No. How are they going to enforce it? Is it affordable? Is it practical? Are they able to effectively enforce currently legislation governing the Internet? Until those questions and many more are satisfied, it's a no. It's not going to work.
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Re: Should lying about age on the Internet be a crime?

Unread postby Valso » 23 August 2020, 16:23

Porn ain't bad for kids. I'm watching porn ever since I was 13. Also I have been drinking red wine since I was first grade (7 yo). And guess what? I became a normal human being.
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Re: Should lying about age on the Internet be a crime?

Unread postby Derek » 23 August 2020, 16:25

:lol:
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Re: Should lying about age on the Internet be a crime?

Unread postby MarkF » 18 October 2020, 16:08

I think it's not so much kids pretending to be adults but rather adults pretending to be kids (since usually, from what I hear, it's often adults who are actually sexual predators pretending to be kids with the specific intent of tricking kids into revealing personal information about themselves on the idea that the kid believes they're talking to another kid, and being tricked into thinking "What could possibly go wrong?" when the "other kid" asks for personal information).

Of course, how does one prove such things as long as nothing bad happens? I talked once with someone about laws like COPPA - he said it's a nice idea in theory, but how do you enforce it in real life? As long as someone doesn't give away something that someone their age couldn't know first-hand, how do you prove that they're the age (whatever it is) that they claim that they are?
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Re: Should lying about age on the Internet be a crime?

Unread postby Raynethemagi » 7 March 2021, 05:55

It depends on what website they're lying when it comes to their age. For example, doesn't Facebook have some sort of restriction when it comes to age? I dunno, cause I don't go on Facebook anymore, based on many factors, but last time I checked Facebook had a age restriction on it. However, if they lie on a site like that, no I don't see that as an actual crime. Sure, one could say that the reason why Facebook has an age restriction on it is to prevent things like Pedophilia from happening or at least reduce the amount of situations that could result in such. However, there's no law saying that lying about your age on a social media platform is illegal, so if one lies about their age, I see no problem. And, if Facebook doesn't ban them or delete them from their site, that's Facebook's problem.

But if they're going on a website where, lawfully, you have to be 18 years or older to view the website, and yet you view it anyway, then yeah, that's illegal and should result in some sort of punishment. Most websites that are like that usually have a warning pop-up on their screen just so that the person on the other side of the screen knows what they're getting into. So yeah, in that instance, I can see that being a major problem.

But, I agree, how do you regulate something like that? I'll be honest with you, regulating something like the internet is a REALLY tricky thing to do. First of all, when 2 people message eachother over the internet, you have to understand that this form of communication is really poor. When you talk to someone, you can usually tell what kind of message they're trying to convey. There's tone of voice, body language, etc... So, when you talk to someone in person, you can usually tell how they feel on something based on how they present the information. Over the internet, you don't have that luxury. You literally just have text on a screen and that's it. Sure, you can use emoticons to give you an idea of how they present the information, but without having the actual person present, there's always going to be room for misinterpretation.

In saying that, there are many things that can be mistaken for something as simple as bullying. I know some people, not a lot, but there are some people who address their friends in an odd way. For example, someone could be emailing someone, and the first thing they type is "Hey Whore." Now, if anyone I knew typed that to me, especially since they know me, I'd be like "excuse me? Say again?!" But some people greet other people that way. If someone is regulating e-mails, and finds that to be offensive, it could be considered cyberbullying when really, it's not. So, while regulating the internet sounds like a good idea, you could actually be doing more harm than good.

Lol, I realized I strayed from the actual argument. I was giving an example of how regulating the internet would be really hard. Let's talk about the actual question about lying on the internet about your age.

I think putting a false number for your age on the internet in general, shouldn't be a crime. I think, really, it should be up to the parents discretion. I think that if lying about your age on the internet would be considered a crime, to me that sounds like a form of babysitting. There are plenty of ways to monitor your child's activity on the internet. And, I trust most families. Yeah, some families are VERY dysfunctional, but, most families make sure their child grows up to be a law-abiding citizen. If you're worried that your 13 yr. old is looking at porn, then install something on your computer that monitors their activity on the net. Maybe limit their time on the computer so they have less of a chance to visit those kind of websites. Or, maybe plan a Family Game Night, or plan something every day of the week. This will help solidify your relationship with your child, while at the same time limiting the chance they become bored (boredom can be a gateway to looking at porn too).

I just think that families should be more responsible when it comes to your own children. I think there's too much babysitting going on regarding the law than families being held responsible. Cause, I guarantee it, if you hold the parents responsible for their child's behavior (before the child turns 18), parents would think twice before they'd allow their child to do the things their child does. For example, I have a major gripe against ratings. Why do you think we have ratings? Well, I'm not saying this is the real reason, but I'm pretty sure it's one reason, and that is, some parent got mad at some company (Let's say EA, which is a company that makes computer games), but some parent got mad at EA for putting their game out and not putting a warning on it saying it's only for mature audiences. Because, the idea is, if they would've put some sort of warning about the nature of the game, that their child would not have bought the game to begin with. When really, the parent is just pointing fingers at a company that's not responsible for your child's behavior. If you really cared about what your child see's on television, whether it be a movie or in this case a game, you'll make rules for that child to follow. But, because you have parents who are irresponsible, we have to have ratings now for everything, just so that the company doesn't have to deal with terrible parents.

Don't get me wrong, there are some games, and movies, that come out that are questionable, and ratings make it easier to understand why that certain game or movie got the rating they got. But, with the way we can access information nowadays, there's really no reason to wonder if a game is good for your child or not. This situation is no different. It's not really up to a company to make sure your child isn't doing something illegal, it's up to the parent. And if their child does something stupid, since you are considered their Guardian till the age of 18, if they do something stupid and you're responsible for your child, maybe it'll make you a little bit more diligent on keeping an eye on your child before they do something dumb again.

I could go into more detail about how we are starting to misinterpret what crime means anymore, and people are getting away with more stuff than they did years ago, but that involves politics and such, and although this would be the forum to talk about this kind of thing, I'd rather not. Unfortunately, we live in a world where, if you vote for certain people, there's a group of people who won't take you seriously. If you'd like to talk politics to me, you can always message me.
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